Posts Tagged ‘Summary Judgment’

2 Seventh Day Adventist Organizations Bring Trademark Infringement Lawsuit Against Breakaway Church

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit rejected a defendants’ motion dismiss various trademark infringement claims brought against him by two Seventh Day Adventist organizations. Suit was brought by General Conference Corporation of Seventh-Day Adventists and General Conference of Seventh-Day Adventists (Plaintiffs/Adventists) against Walter McGill (Defendant), after McGill broke off from the Seventh Day Adventist Church congregation and began his own congregation (apparently of which there are only 3 members) under the name Creation 7th Day Adventist Church.

trademark infringement attorneysOriginally Adventists brought a trademark infringement lawsuit against McGill in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee at Jackson for his use of protected marks belonging to Adventists in advertising and promoting his breakaway church. In response, McGill brought a motion to dismiss based on the Free Exercise Clause and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), which was denied by the district court. Subsequently, and after McGill’s repeated refusal to appear for a court-ordered mediation to which he had initially consented, the district court entered default judgment against him and granted partial summary judgment in favor of Adventists.

Continue reading 2 Seventh Day Adventist Organizations Bring Trademark Infringement Lawsuit Against Breakaway Church »

Viacom v. Google / YouTube Continued- the Trademark-Infringement Lawsuit Between Viacom and Google / YouTube Receives Summary Judgment

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

In an article posted Monday about Judge Stanton’s ruling in the form of summary judgment in favor of Defendants Google and YouTube, the contours of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) Safe Harbor provision were explored. The authors noted that to be able to appeal to the protection offered by the DMCA’s Safe Harbor provision;

“Any website that allows users to post comments or materials, including on blogs and bulletin boards, must do the following:
(1) identify an agent to receive complaints of infringement and register that agent with the Copyright Office;
(2) publish on the website the procedures that copyright owners must follow to arrange for the take down of infringing content;
(3) follow a takedown procedure that complies with the DMCA; and
(4) establish a policy and procedures for preventing repeat infringers from posting content on the website.”

The DMCA takedown procedure (3) is spelled out with reference to the appropriate authorities here.

Continue reading Viacom v. Google / YouTube Continued- the Trademark-Infringement Lawsuit Between Viacom and Google / YouTube Receives Summary Judgment »